Stern’s Marilyn Sold at Doyle’s

This large digital print by Bert Stern – complete with Marilyn’s mark of disapproval – was sold today for $3,750 at Doyle’s of New York. The photographic auction included three other classic Stern/Monroe prints, one of which (also marked by Marilyn) went unsold.

Marilyn in the Windy City

As Midway Airport turns 90, the Chicago Sun-Times has published this library photo of a windswept Marilyn landing there in March 1959 for a promotional jaunt including a press conference at the Ambassador East Hotel, and the roadshow premiere of Some Like It Hot.

Inside the Coca Cola Archive With Marilyn

Marilyn and Coca Cola are among the most recognisable American cultural icons. In an article for the Daily Mail, Anna Hopkins visits the Coca Cola archive managed by Ted Ryan in Atlanta, Georgia and finds images of Marilyn sipping Coke by the pool at Greenacres, the Hollywood home of silent movie comedian turned 3D photographer Harold Lloyd (seen here wearing a blue suit and his trademark spectacles.) She visited in 1953 with Jean Negulesco, supposedly to film a dream sequence for How to Marry a Millionaire. This never transpired, but footage of a seductive Marilyn purring “I hate a careless man” was used in ‘Security Is Common Sense’, a PSA for the US Air Force, warning servicemen against revealing military secrets in letters home.

More shots taken by Harold Lloyd

Studio contract stars like Marilyn were routinely asked to endorse products, although she would do so less frequently in later years. Despite the Mail article’s claims, the Lloyd shoot does not appear to have been directly connected to Coca Cola – but the tacit promotional value was clearly  welcomed, and it has since become part of their glamorous legacy. In 1951, Marilyn was filmed drinking Coke in a scene from Love Nest.  And Edward Clark’s candid shot of Marilyn and co-star Jane Russell enjoying a Coke on the set of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953) was revived in a 2015 company ad campaign.

Marilyn and Avedon: Something Personal

This photo of Marilyn chatting with photographer Richard Avedon at a 1961 Actors Studio benefit at New York’s Roseland Ballroom is published in Avedon: Something Personal, a new biography by Norma Stevens and Steven M.L. Aronson. Marilyn is mentioned in the introduction, where Norma Stevens describes her first meeting with Avedon. A photo of Marilyn and Avedon, taken by Sam Shaw in 1954, is also featured. It’s unclear whether the book includes any further material on their iconic collaborations, but this preview looks very promising.

And as a bonus, here’s the Roseland photo in colour…

‘Fooling the Eye’ With Marilyn

‘Golden Marilyn’, a hyper-realist portrait of Marilyn created in 2010 by the Tulsa-based artist Otto Duecker (after the iconic Ben Ross photo), is featured in Fool the Eye, a new exhibition at the Nassau County Museum of Art in Roslyn Arbor, New York until March 2018, as Deidre Geben reports for Newsday.

More of Otto Duecker’s ‘Marilyns’

“At a time when the word ‘fake’ is dominating conversation, the Nassau County Museum of Art presents ‘Fool the Eye,’ an ambitious examination of truth and illusion comprising more than 150 paintings, sculptures and works on paper from the past two centuries.

‘Whether realist or abstract, all the works in the show play with perceptual effects,’ says Franklin Hill Perrell, who, along with Debbie Wells, guest-curated the exhibition. To be sure, Perrell and Wells have gathered a delightfully mixed bag of visual tricks. Prominent among the optical devices on view is trompe l’oeil, a technique that upends rules of linear perspective to convince viewers they are looking at actual objects instead of two-dimensional representations of them.

Museumgoers are likely to be tempted to peel off the pieces of torn and curling tape seeming to secure Otto Duecker’s black-and-white photographic rendering of Marilyn Monroe to a wall — that is, until they realize it’s all a pictorial ruse.”

TCM Brings Marilyn (and More) to Bonham’s

Marilyn at the St Jude’s Hospital benefit, November 1953

A treasure trove of Hollywood memorabilia will go under the hammer tomorrow at Bonham’s, as part of their latest auction, ‘TCM Presents …. Out Of This World!

Several Marilyn-related items are on offer, including a 1950 memo from Twentieth Century Fox to filmmaker Joseph L. Mankiewicz, confirming her casting as Claudia Caswell in All About Eve; and her contract for Horns of the Devil, a property she purchased in 1954.

Marilyn and Arthur by Janice Sargent, 1958

There is also a group of rare photographs, including some taken by amateur photographer Janice Sargent at a children’s hospital benefit in 1953, and one photo from the 1962 Golden Globes. Two photos of a visibly pregnant Marilyn with husband Arthur Miller, taken by Sargent during filming of Some Like It Hot in 1958, are also featured.

Marilyn with Jose Bolanos (right) at the 1962 Golden Globes

Another lot contains several photos taken during filming of Bus Stop, and an interesting photo of Marilyn and Arthur visiting Montgomery Clift on the set of his 1958 film, Lonelyhearts. Marilyn was working on Some Like It Hot at the time, also on the Samuel Goldwyn Studio lot.

 

Marilyn in Paris Match Exhibit

Photos of Marilyn riding a pink elephant at the circus, taken at an arthritis charity benefit in New York by Walter Carone for Paris Match in 1955, are featured in a new exhibit dedicated to the magazine’s great photographers, at the Argentic Gallery on Rue Daubenton, Paris, until tomorrow, November 19.

Thanks to Eric

‘Nothing Personal’: Richard Avedon’s Marilyn

Marilyn by Richard Avedon (May 6, 1957)

With a major new biography of Richard Avedon, Something Personal, due to be published later this month, the New Yorker‘s Hilton Als looks back at Nothing Personal, the photographer’s 1964 collaboration with author James Baldwin. An exhibit of material from the book will go on display at the Pace/McGill Gallery, NYC, on November 17.

“As an artist, Avedon told the truth about lies, and why we need them or metaphors to survive, and how people fit into their self-mythologizing like body bags, and die in them if they’re not careful. Look at his portrait of Marilyn Monroe in Nothing Personal, perhaps one of the most difficult pictures in the book. In an interview, Dick said Monroe had given a performance as Marilyn Monroe earlier in the shoot, laughing and giggling and dancing. But then the shoot was over, and where was she? Who was she? Nothing Personal is riddled with these questions of identity—what makes a self?—a question that gave a certain thirteen-year-old ideas about the questions he might ask in this world: Who are we? To each other? And why?”