Rare Greene Footage Shows Private Marilyn

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Vanity Fair has released footage shot by Milton Greene at Marilyn’s 1956 wedding to Arthur Miller, as well as on the set of Bus Stop and The Prince and the Showgirl, to promote the current Greene exhibit at the Morrison Hotel Gallery in Los Angeles. While most of the footage has been seen before, it is still a rare glimpse behind the scenes of Marilyn’s fabled life.

Fact Check: Marilyn, Joe and the Baseball Hall of Fame

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Joe DiMaggio’s induction at the Baseball Hall of Fame (1955)

As many fans will know, Marilyn and Joe DiMaggio remained close long after their brief, stormy marriage came to an abrupt end. However, as David Mikkelson points out in an article for myth-busting website Snopes, even museums get their facts wrong sometimes.

“Several years ago I finally undertook a long-awaited pilgrimage to that mecca of sportsdom, the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum founded in Cooperstown, N.Y., by Stephen Carlton Clark. Like so many fans before me, I spent a couple of days scrutinizing every exhibit, photograph, document, and other pieces of memorabilia on display at the museum, and then … wondered what the heck else there was to do in Cooperstown. And again like so many fans before me, I ended up at the second-best-known attraction in town, the nearby Farmers’ Museum.

The proprietor’s spiel was to recount a brief history of Stephen Carlton Clark’s role in the establishment of the Hall of Fame and the Farmers’ Museum, and to note that after founding the former, Clark lived in New York City and didn’t return to Cooperstown for the yearly induction ceremonies — save for one exception. That exception was the year Joe Dimaggio was inducted to the Hall, an occasion for which, the proprietor declared, Clark returned to Cooperstown ‘in order to meet Dimaggio’s wife, Marilyn Monroe.’

I immediately recognized a chronological problem with that account: Joe Dimaggio was inducted into the Hall of Fame on 22 July 1955, but he and Marilyn Monroe had separated, with the former filing for divorce, in October 1954. Although the pair remained on relatively friendly terms afterwards, Monroe wasn’t present at the July 1955 induction that welcomed the Yankee Clipper into baseball’s hallowed halls.

On that day Joltin’ Joe was accompanied not by a glamorous starlet, but by a Yankees official … Photographs and newsreel footage of the event also reveal no evidence of the Blonde Bombshell’s presence in Cooperstown that day … For the record, no contemporaneous accounts of the ceremonies mentioned the presence of Clark in Cooperstown that day, either.”

Halsman’s Marilyn in Barcelona

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Spanish fans may be interested to know that the touring exhibit, Philippe Halsman: Astonish Me! is now on display at the CaixaForum Barcelona until November 6, as Samuel Spencer reports for BlouArtInfo. (I have corrected some minor errors in the extract below.)

“Featuring 300 photographs and documents from the photographer’s extensive career, Astonish Me! is the first Spanish retrospective of the American photographer [born and raised in Austria] who, among other achievements, undertook 110 covers for LIFE magazine. Halsman also popularized the portrait concept of people jumping — at the time a revolutionary idea that has since become a photographic cliché, unavoidable at any graduation ceremony.

Termed ‘jumpology’ by Halsman, jumping was used by him as a psychological tool. He believed that it showed people without inhibitions; as he once said, when someone jumps, “the mask falls.” As such, Halsman saw it as a crucial tool for photographing celebrities, allowing him to cut through the façade of their media image.

Among the jumpologists Halsman shows in the exhibition are Marilyn Monroe, who he tried to convince for three years to jump for a shoot before she finally agreed. Monroe jumped 200 times for the resulting image, which became iconic when it appeared on the LIFE cover in 1957 [actually, it was in 1959.]

Julien’s Adds Frieda Hull Collection to November Sale

Members of the Monroe Six with Marilyn on James Haspiel's birthday, 1959. (Frieda Hull is pictured kneeling directly below MM.)
Members of the Monroe Six with Marilyn on James Haspiel’s birthday, 1959. (Frieda Hull is pictured kneeling directly below MM.)

A trove of rare photos from the estate of Frieda Hull – a former member of the Monroe Six, the group of loyal fans who befriended Marilyn after her move to New York in 1955 – has been added to the upcoming Julien’s Auctions sale, set for November and also including items from the David Gainsborough Roberts Collection and Marilyn’s own personal archive, as Just Collecting reports. (This follows the sale of fellow Monroe Sixer Jimmy Collins‘ photo collection at Heritage Auctions earlier this year.)

“Hull’s job as an airline employee also enabled her to follow Monroe on the West Coast, and throughout her life she built up an archive of rare photographs spanning the actress’ entire career.

In addition to the photographs that members of the ‘Six’ took themselves, Hull’s collection features a wide range of previously unseen images. They include unseen colour photos of Monroe as she sang ‘Happy Birthday’ for President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden; slides of her on location filming the iconic subway skirt-blowing scene from The Seven Year Itch; and images of her and husband Arthur Miller after the premiere of Some Like It Hot in 1959.

In all, the Frieda Hull collection includes 550 colour and black & white candid photographs, more than 150 slides, close to 750 movie stills, publicity photos and lobby cards, and even personal home movies of Monroe leaving her New York apartment in 1958.

Aside for the photographic archive, Hull’s personal collection also includes memorabilia such as locks of Monroe’s hair, a scarf gifted by Monroe herself, Hull’s original ticket and program to the 1962 JFK Madison Square Garden gala, and a Gladstone Hotel menu autographed by Monroe and Miller.”

Just four years younger than Monroe, Frieda Hull died in Las Vegas in 2014, aged 83. You can read her obituary here. And for an exclusive sneak preview of the Frieda Hull collection, visit Scott Fortner’s blog here.

“It was an absolute thrill to work with Julien’s on the Frieda Hull Collection.  I was repeatedly delighted and dumbstruck over the photos in this archive, many of which I’d never seen.  Fans will be overjoyed and amazed with these new unpublished images of Marilyn.  Below are some shots from my study as part of my sorting process, which was no small task considering the sheer volume of photos.  All totaled, an unprecedented 142 lots of photos will be offered in the auction, the majority of which were taken by members of the Monroe Six.”

David Bromley: Painting Marilyn

Marilyn by David Bromley, after Kashio Aoki's 1952 photo
Marilyn by David Bromley, after Kashio Aoki’s 1952 photo

‘Marilyn at 90: A Tribute to David Bromley’ features a number of paintings by the Australian artist, and is currently running at the Andrew Weiss Gallery in Los Angeles alongside another Bromley exhibition, ‘L.A. Women’, until September 1.

This David Bromley painting is inspired by a Milton Greene portrait of Marilyn
This David Bromley painting is inspired by a Milton Greene portrait of Marilyn
Another Greene-inspired painting
Another Greene-inspired painting

 

Steve Rowland Remembers Marilyn

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Steve Rowland was a movie actor in the 1950s, later becoming a record producer in London. His 2008 memoir, Hollywood Heat, is now available via Kindle. This weekend, Britain’s Express published a series of extracts detailing his encounters with stars including Marilyn.

Rowland describes meeting her by chance at a doctor’s office in Los Angeles in 1957. However, she spent that year in New York. The movie he was preparing for was Gun Glory, released in July. It’s possible, then, that he  may actually have met Marilyn during the spring of 1956, when she was in L.A. to film Bus Stop.

“In 1957, I came down with a very bad case of the flu. Our family doctor, Dr. Motchan, being the friend of our family that he was, told me to come to the office before it opened. He knew that I was needed in wardrobe at MGM and that I was to start a film in Garberville CA in ten days.

This was an important break for me as it was a feature role in a western with Stewart Granger and Rhonda Fleming. When I entered the office I noticed a very bedraggled yet sexy woman sitting in one of the waiting room chairs.

My throat felt like it had a hundred rusty nails in it and my nose was plugged up as if I was at the bottom of a well. Nevertheless, I couldn’t help but check out the sexy lady sitting opposite me. She was overly nice to me, offered me Kleenex and sympathy, and we started talking.

After a couple of minutes we seemed to bond. There was something very familiar about her, I couldn’t put my finger on it, but I found her interesting. About that time, the doctor called me into his office for a shot of penicillin.

As I lowered my Levi’s and bent over to receive the shot, I asked the doctor ‘who was that chick in the waiting room? I asked her to join me for a cup of coffee after I leave here.’

The doctor started laughing and said ‘Steve, don’t you know who that is? That’s Marilyn Monroe!’

I almost had a heart attack, quickly pulled up my pants, rushed out into the waiting room – but Marilyn was gone with the wind.”

Celebrating Marilyn at Stonewall

Quote from 'Conversations With Marilyn' by WJ Weatherby
Quote from ‘Conversations With Marilyn’ by WJ Weatherby

‘Marilyn Monroe: Kissing an Icon’, a new exhibition focusing on her enduring popularity within the LGBT community, is now on display until August 7 at the Stonewall National Museum & Archives in Fort Lauderdale, as Johnny Diaz reports for SouthFlorida.com.

“Curated by Charles L. Ross, the free exhibit features fan memorabilia from the private collection of Wilton Manors resident Ed Witkowski.

‘When Marilyn Monroe died in 1962 I was 14 years old,’ Witkowski said. ‘Marilyn Monroe was a woman who had ultimate sex appeal. I really did not know what sex appeal was at that age, but I felt it as a young teenage boy coming-of-age.’

According to the exhibit, Monroe was ahead of her time on LGBT issues, and many gay men related to her struggles with insecurity and finding acceptance.

‘I really think it’s because she was vulnerable and talked about her life. She talked about how she struggled and that made her different. Gay people felt different and misunderstood,’ said Ross, chief curator at Stonewall. He remembers, as a teenager in Pennsylvania, when news of her death broke over the radio.

The exhibit marks a departure for the gallery, which has generally focused on people who are LGBT.

‘This is so different because there are so many people who had an interest in Marilyn Monroe and still have an interest in Marilyn Monroe,’ Ross said. ‘It won’t be just for the LGBT community. Straight men and women would go too.'”

Marilyn Monroe 1926-1962

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