Dayton’s ‘Misfits’: Memories Needed

Filming 'The Misfits', 1960

The Historical Society of Dayton Valley is joining Dayton Valley Days’ organizers, romancing the days when Marilyn arrived in Dayton in a pink Cadillac, usually parked in front of the Union Hotel.

Usually late for filming, while other stars waited impatiently, Marilyn arrived, acting nonchalantly, taking time for the kids and locals.

So far, we expect The Misfits Troupe to participate in a melodramatic skit at the Odeon where much of the movie was shot, display photo exhibits of the stars, reminiscences of those who were part of the action, a Misfits’ theme for the DVD’s parade and much more.

If anyone has photographs or remembrances of the summer, fifty years ago, that The Misfits arrived in Dayton or who were extras in the movie, we’d like to hear your personal stories.

Laura Tennant is a Nevada native, Dayton historian and the Leader-Courier’s former editor. Comments are welcome. Call 775-246-3256, e-mail, L10ant38@gmail.com or write, P.O. Box 143, Dayton, NV, 89403.

Source

Carroll, Aoki at LA Gallery

Among the more rare items on display at the ‘Becoming Marilyn’ exhibition, at the Andrew Weiss Gallery in Los Angeles, are these photographs of Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio arriving at Tokyo Airport in March 1954 for their honeymoon, taken by Kashio Aoki.

Allie Is Wired reports that Bill Carroll, one of the first professional photographers to work with then-model Norma Jeane Dougherty in 1946 made a special guest appearance at the gallery last week, and shared his memories of the young MM. (The article dates Carroll’s photographs to 1945, but from her hair colour I would say it was taken a year later.)

In 1945, Carroll was in need of “cover cards” for his film business and decided to schedule a Santa Monica photo shoot with his friend’s recent catch, Norma Jeane. Carroll wanted a “good-looking Plain Jane, the kind of kid you’d like to live next to” and thought Norma Jeane fit the bill. It wasn’t until 40 years later when “leafing through Time Magazine” that Carroll recognized a picture of Norma Jean by David Conover that he processed oh so many years ago. Carroll spent the next few months going through old photographs until he found all of the 1945 photos of a young Marilyn Monroe posing in Santa Monica.

Rare outtake by Bill Carroll

June 29, 1956

Photo by Milton Greene

At 7:21pm, Marilyn Monroe and Arthur Miller were married by Judge Seymour Rabinowitz in a civil wedding at the Westchester County Court House in White Plains, New York. Guests included Arthur’s cousin, Morton.

A more elaborate, Jewish ceremony was held on July 1st, attended by family and friends.

Maf the Dog at Southbank Centre

Robin Davey

Prizewinning novelist Andrew O’Hagan’s The Life and Opinions of Maf the Dog and of His Friend Marilyn Monroe is a literary comedy full of philosophy, comedy and heartbreak.

‘The book is a miracle,’ wrote Edna O’Brien, ‘and already a classic’.

For this special event, Andrew O’Hagan leads an ensemble reading of Maf the Dog with some of Britain’s leading actors, including Ian MacDiarmid (Six Characters in Search of an Author, Star Wars) and Suzanne Bertish (Breakfast at Tiffany’s, The Hunger.)

Sunday 18 July 2010, 7:45pm

Southbank Centre, London

Ticket information here

Read my review of Maf the Dog, here

Keeping Time with Marilyn

This Girard Perregaux Stainless Steel Marilyn Monroe Timepiece, part of the Girard Perregaux 1945 collection, is available in a limited edition of just thirty.

On sale now for $8,500, only at Essential Watches

Press Release

(However, if cheap and cheerful is more your thing, try this watch instead – currently on offer at Ebay and various online stores. My husband bought this for me on my birthday – it’s cute as a button, keeps time, and cost around £2 including speedy delivery from China!)


Phil Stern Exhibition, Milan

Phil Stern, 1953

“When you think of photographs of famous people you think of the paparazzi. But when you see Phil Stern’s photographs of Hollywood icons like Marilyn Monroe and James Dean you think of art. Not only are his photos moments captured in time, but they are also art – photos of an era long gone. Phil Stern managed to break down the wall of celebrity and show people for who they really were. When you’re talking iconic photographers you can’t really look any further.”

Marc Baker, ‘The Vine’

Forma Gallery

The X-Rays of Others

Marilyn in 1954

A 1954 X-ray of Marilyn Monroe’s chest is reported to have sold for $45,000 (about £30,000) at the ‘Hollywood Legends’ auction in Las Vegas this weekend. Here’s the item description from Julien’s Auctions:

X-ray of Marilyn Monroe’s chest. Printed on the x-ray is the following information, “Cedars of Lebanon Hospital/Drs. E. Freedman and S. Finck/ Name Di Maggio Marilyn/ No. 50612 Date 11-10-54/ Ref. By Dr. L. Krohn.” As a radiology resident at Cedars, a young doctor obtained these x-rays. When he taught at the school himself, he used these x-rays to ensure that students were paying attention. Monroe was said to have known about the x-rays and their use, about which she said “Isn’t that sweet.” Monroe’s hospital visit was said to be for her chronic endometriosis – or as her doctor’s described it, “For correction of a female disorder she has suffered for years.” Accompanied by a copy of the X-Ray. 17 by 13 3/4 inches

It’s hard to know what to make of Marilyn’s comment at the time, or how she might have felt about this sale.

The X-Ray dates from November 1954, when Marilyn underwent surgery to relieve her chronic endometriosis. Photos taken of her leaving Cedars of Lebanon Hospital the following day showed her to be extremely distressed by the paparazzi’s presence.

To illustrate this point, I have posted the least upsetting photo from this occasion above (I have no intention of posting the X-ray here. This is a personal decision, those who wish to see it can search on Google.)

In The X-Rays of Others, an article for yesterday’s Huffington Post, Dr Elaine Schattner criticises the auction:

It seems ironic that Monroe, who was hospitalized for gynecological reasons and died childless, has no descendants to hold her records near, to intervene or somehow say “no, the x-rays are off-limits.” Rather, it’s her doctor’s children who’ve cut the deal.

I can’t help thinking that she, who struggled so in her life, in and out of strangers’ households, love affairs and flicks, is defenseless now again. The films render her vulnerable, again, to more inspection. The loss of privacy is irrevocable, a violation after death.

Read full article here