Marilyn’s ‘Haunted Hollywood’ Parade

Marilyn is featured on the cover of Haunted Hollywood, a Halloween special edition from US magazine Parade. Presumably the oft-told tale of her haunting the Roosevelt Hotel on Hollywood Boulevard will be mentioned. Contrary to rumour, she was never a permanent resident. However, Marilyn did pose for photos by the pool in 1952. Today, guests can check into the Marilyn Monroe Suite – but watch out for her ghost in the mirror!

Marilyn at the Roosevelt Hotel, 1952

Marilyn’s ‘Love ‘n’ Desire’ for Heritage Auctions

This original photo of Marilyn facing the paparazzi with Milton Greene at Madison Square Garden in March 1955 (on the night she rode a pink elephant for charity at the Ringling Brothers circus) is going up for sale on November 3rd, as part of Heritage Auctions‘ Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signatures event. The verso is marked ‘MM-56’, and dated September ’55; stamped twice, with the magazine title TV and Movie Screen, and a credit for the Neal Peters Collection, plus a caption: ‘Love ‘n’ Desire?’

Also on offer is a set of documents related to Some Like It Hot, including legal permission for real machine guns to be used in the movie; and the December 2005 issue of Playboy, featuring Marilyn on the cover, and signed by founder Hugh Hefner.

Bye Bye Monroe (and Van Gogh)

Dennis Magdich for Playboy, 1978

Marilyn and Vincent Van Gogh are referenced together in ‘Bye Bye Caroline‘, the new single by Swiss heavy rockers Gotthard (and featuring Status Quo’s Francis Rossi), as Polly Glass reports for Louder Sound.

“We can’t decide if ‘It ain’t nothing like Van Gogh/Or even Marilyn Monroe’ is one of the best or worst lyrics we’ve heard all year (actually it probably is one of the worst, but we say that with love…), but either way we can’t help tapping our toes along to this Quo-tastic new song from ‘the most successful band from Switzerland’. Lyrically inspired by Rossi’s 1973 Carolineit’s a bouncy romp of piano, guitars, harmonicas and unpretentious fun. Check out more on upcoming compilation Defrosted 2.”

Claire Trevor’s Concern for Marilyn

While she may not have achieved the pinnacle of stardom, Claire Trevor was that Hollywood rarity: a beautiful blonde who broke the mould and became an acclaimed character actress. She began her career at Fox in the 1930s, and like Marilyn after her, was frustrated by Darryl F. Zanuck’s indifference to her talent. She fared better at other studios, and played her first great role in John Ford’s Stagecoach (1939.) She went on to star in Farewell My Lovely (1944), and would win an Oscar for her outstanding performance in Key Largo (1948.)

By the 1950s, Claire was still working steadily in film, stage and television, and had found lasting happiness in her third marriage, to producer Milton H. Bren. As author Derek Sculthorpe reveals in his new biography, Claire Trevor: Queen of Film Noir, she was aware of the pressures faced by younger stars.

“At the same time, she talked more frequently about retirement. ‘What’s all this about, anyway?’ she asked. ‘The fame is nonsense – I’ve found that out – and I’ve been to all the parties I want to go to and had the social chi-chi. I can’t take it anymore.’ She expressed concern over some young actresses such as Marilyn Monroe and Elizabeth Taylor and the physical and emotional effects the filmmaking business was having on them. She wondered why Monroe became ill whenever she made a film. ‘Is it exhausted nerves or a bronchial condition?'”

In 1963, Claire played Richard Beymer’s mother in The Stripper, adapted from William Inge’s play, A Loss of Roses. As Sculthorpe points out, the script had originally been earmarked for Marilyn in 1961, under the title Celebration. Costume designer Travilla had drawn up sketches for Marilyn’s character before she ultimately declined, committing instead to Something’s Got to Give.

“Joanne Woodward is a marvellous actress who did well wearing a platinum blonde wig looking for all the world like Marilyn Monroe. It was no surprise that the part was intended for Marilyn Monroe, which would have put the film in a different league. Monroe would have been a natural to convey the little girl lost at the heart of the piece, but died a short time before filming began. The male lead was offered to Pat Boone, who turned it down on moral grounds. Warren Beatty was also offered the role and he too declined. The part of the mother was offered first to Jo Van Fleet, who turned it down, after which it was given to Trevor.”

Henri Dauman ‘Looks Up’ in the Hamptons

Henri Dauman, the French-born photographer who came to New York after losing both parents in World War II, is the subject of a new documentary,  Henri Dauman: Looking Up, which will premiere this weekend at the Hamptons International Film Festival. Dauman photographed Marilyn on several occasions, including the 1959 David di Donatello Awards (see above.) He has spoken about his long career in an interview for The Hamptons website.

“Henri Dauman is one of the world’s most preeminent photographers, working with the likes of JFK, Elvis Presley, Marilyn Monroe, Andy Warhol, Jane Fonda, Malcolm X, Miles Davis, Yves Saint-Laurent and many, many more. However, since Dauman came of age during a time when photographers weren’t widely recognized for their exceptional works, he’s not necessarily a household name, as he well deserves to be.

The photographer was featured in his first solo exhibition in 2014, and his photos have been showcased in several more since. Now his extraordinary life is the subject of the directorial debut of Peter Kenneth Jones’ Henri Dauman: Looking Up…

How did moving to New York impact your photography? 

HD: A lot because all of the sudden I was in the land that I was dreaming about while seeing American movies. When I was a child I went quite a bit to the movies and saw a lot of American movies. I said, ‘My god, I finally landed in Hollywood-land.’ I was very impressed with the skyscrapers, the size of the city, which was different than Paris which is smaller on the human scale. Here, everything was large…

What does it mean to you that your work still resonates deeply with people, many, many years after these photographs were initially taken?

HD: I’m very pleased because I thought my work was fading away, but apparently, unbeknownst to me, I had covered a great story overall of the evolution of the United States from the ’50s to the ’80s. I didn’t know it at the time, but I did so many varied stories – whether it’s a civil rights story or shooting Marilyn Monroe or Brigitte Bardot, when you add up all the stories, it added up to a narrative history of the United States.”

‘Essentially Marilyn’ Extended in LA

Essentially Marilyn, the exhibition showcasing the collection of Maite Minguez Ricart, has been extended through October 28 at the Paley Center for Media in Los Angeles, reports Broadway World – and there’s more news on the upcoming auction…

“Profiles in History is proud to announce their next legendary, blockbuster Hollywood auction to be held December 11th, 12th and 13th in Los Angeles, and will go on display at The Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills, currently the site of Essentially Marilyn: the Exhibit, starting October 4th and running through October 28.

Essentially Marilyn: The Auction will be on the morning of December 11th, before the Hollywood auction begins.

They have added an unreleased studio master recording of Marilyn Monroe singing the song ‘Down, Boy!‘ from Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, which was never filmed. It is being sold with copyright and is estimated to sell for $100,000 – $150,000.”

Marilyn, Bruce Campbell and the Oscar Date That Never Was

Marilyn was (infamously) never nominated for an Oscar, and only attended the ceremony once, to present an award for All About Eve in 1951. However, in an interview for Hollywood Life, actor Bruce Campbell – who made his name in the cult 1981 horror film, The Evil Dead – reveals a family memory that may provide another tenuous link to Oscar.

“Show me a successful person, and I’ll show you someone who’s life is falling apart. It really is — it’s so true of so many people. Show business — show me a really successful actor, like really successful, and I bet their personal life is for sh*t.

I heard one time — Marilyn Monroe. No one would ask her out, because they always assumed she was with somebody. And an uncle of mine was an animator for Disney, years back in the Fifties, and they said, ‘hey, Marilyn Monroe’s looking for a date to the Academy Awards. Do you want to do?’ He’s like, ‘bullsh*t. She’s not looking for anything.’ And she didn’t go that year, because she didn’t have anyone to go with. Ain’t that weird?

Prettiest girl in school. Talk to the prettiest girl in school. Some guys may be like, ‘oh, she can’t — I can’t touch her.’”