Coast to Coast: Marilyn Mural-Spotting

This street art image of Marilyn was spotted by Elisa of L.A. Woman Tours along Hollywood Boulevard today. ‘It’s based off a photoshopped hybrid of Marilyn’s face and someone else’s body,’ Elisa notes, ‘but it’s cute and a nice thought. I love seeing Marilyn so many places. It’s like she’s saying hello!’

Meanwhile in Florida, the Vitale Brothers have unveiled their latest mural (based on Alfred Eisenstadt’s 1953 photo of Marilyn) at the Playhouse Theatre in St. Petersburg, a city with a historic connection to MM – she spent time there with ex-husband Joe DiMaggio in 1961.

Marilyn Lights Up Fort Lauderdale

This wall mural of Marilyn in the MASS district of Flagler Village is just one of many new additions to this up-and-coming Fort Lauderdale suburb, as Phillip Valys reports for SouthFlorida.com. (Photo by Jennifer Lett of the Sun Sentinel.)

Marilyn ‘Pops Up’ to Palm Beach

This 1956 photo of Marilyn hugging a copy of the ancient Greek statue, ‘The Discus Thrower’, at Joe Schenck’s Beverly Hills home can be seen in the sumptuous new Milton Greene book, The Essential Marilyn Monroe. It also appears in The Women, a pop-up exhibition at the new Assouline bookstore in the Royal Poinciana Plaza, organised by gallery owner James Danziger and on display from January 12-16, reports the Palm Beach Daily News.

Marilyn Movie Series at Ripley’s Orlando

Wardrobe test for ‘The Seven Year Itch’

Ripley’s Museum in Orlando, Florida is organising several events alongside the current display of Marilyn’s ‘Happy Birthday’ dress, including a lookalike contest and screenings of Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, Some Like It Hot and The Seven Year Itch in December – more details here.

Celebrating Marilyn at Stonewall

Quote from 'Conversations With Marilyn' by WJ Weatherby
Quote from ‘Conversations With Marilyn’ by WJ Weatherby

‘Marilyn Monroe: Kissing an Icon’, a new exhibition focusing on her enduring popularity within the LGBT community, is now on display until August 7 at the Stonewall National Museum & Archives in Fort Lauderdale, as Johnny Diaz reports for SouthFlorida.com.

“Curated by Charles L. Ross, the free exhibit features fan memorabilia from the private collection of Wilton Manors resident Ed Witkowski.

‘When Marilyn Monroe died in 1962 I was 14 years old,’ Witkowski said. ‘Marilyn Monroe was a woman who had ultimate sex appeal. I really did not know what sex appeal was at that age, but I felt it as a young teenage boy coming-of-age.’

According to the exhibit, Monroe was ahead of her time on LGBT issues, and many gay men related to her struggles with insecurity and finding acceptance.

‘I really think it’s because she was vulnerable and talked about her life. She talked about how she struggled and that made her different. Gay people felt different and misunderstood,’ said Ross, chief curator at Stonewall. He remembers, as a teenager in Pennsylvania, when news of her death broke over the radio.

The exhibit marks a departure for the gallery, which has generally focused on people who are LGBT.

‘This is so different because there are so many people who had an interest in Marilyn Monroe and still have an interest in Marilyn Monroe,’ Ross said. ‘It won’t be just for the LGBT community. Straight men and women would go too.'”

Curtis Sneary’s ‘Marilyn Monroe Selfie’

curtis sneary

Curtis Sneary, a pop artist living in St Petersburg, Florida is the subject of a new exhibition, as Janelle Faignant reports for Creative Loafing. And on his own website, Sneary shows how he created his painting, ‘Marilyn Monroe Selfie‘, a tongue-in-cheek update to her famous ‘subway scene’ in The Seven Year Itch.  (Fans will know that Marilyn visited St Petersburg in 1961, while ex-husband Joe DiMaggio was coaching the New York Yankees.)

“Sneary and his wife have lived in St. Pete for 14 years now. They are a team in his artwork, with Beth handling business issues and modeling for many pieces, (her body became Marilyn Monroe’s in that painting) and their goal is to make their whole house into a studio in the near future.

Sneary says the answer to the question ‘How long does it take to finish?’ is a lifetime.

‘Because you put all this knowledge into it,’ he says, adding that the physical work averages about 40 hours, or a month to six weeks.

Sneary has shown the landscapes in galleries and sold well but his satirical pop art has been slower to sell, despite its popularity with audiences.

‘It’s not over-the-couch kind of work,’ he says.”

An ‘Itch’ for Marilyn in Palm Beach

monroe

Photos of Marilyn filming the ‘subway scene’ for The Seven Year Itch in New York, 1954, are currently on display at the Norton Museum of Art, as Jan Sjostrom reports for the Palm Beach Daily News. They are owned by Beth Rudin DeWoody, whose vast collection of 20th century photography and video is showcased in a new exhibit, Still/Moving, open now until May 15.  (The unidentified author of these images may one of several photographers who covered the event, including Elliott Erwitt, Sam Shaw, and George S. Zimbel.)