An ‘Itch’ for Marilyn in Palm Beach

monroe

Photos of Marilyn filming the ‘subway scene’ for The Seven Year Itch in New York, 1954, are currently on display at the Norton Museum of Art, as Jan Sjostrom reports for the Palm Beach Daily News. They are owned by Beth Rudin DeWoody, whose vast collection of 20th century photography and video is showcased in a new exhibit, Still/Moving, open now until May 15.  (The unidentified author of these images may one of several photographers who covered the event, including Elliott Erwitt, Sam Shaw, and George S. Zimbel.)

‘Marilyn Lives’ on the Coronado Shore

m12The memory of Sugar Kane is alive and well on Coronado Island, where scenes from Some Like it Hot were filmed, Jackie Burrell writes in The Reporter.

“Surf surges against this pristine shore, the white sand dotted picturesquely with red-striped cabanas. A paved footpath leads up to the iconic grand hotel. And it doesn’t take much imagination to see Marilyn Monroe on this beach, sun-kissed and wind-swept in her short white beach robe.

In fact, it takes no imagination at all. All over Coronado Island you’ll see photographs taken during the filming of Some Like It Hot, the 1959 comedy starring a ukulele-playing Monroe, and Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis as fellow members of her, ahem, girl band bound for Florida.

Much to the consternation of Miami’s then-mayor, the role of Florida beach was played by this stretch of strand, which is crowned by the 19th-century Hotel Del Coronado. Legend has it that Coronado’s mayor told his much-aggrieved Floridian counterpart, ‘Some like it hot, but not as hot as Miami in September.’

Coronado actually is the bulbous end of a skinny peninsula that connects the ‘island’ to the mainland in Imperial Beach, seven miles south. But it’s easy to forget such topographic technicalities as you cross the sweeping bridge or arrive by ferry from San Diego.”

MM Estate Sues Florida Strip Club

A West Palm Beach strip club is being sued by Marilyn’s estate for copyright infringement, reports the Sun-Sentinel:

“Marilyn Monroe may have been the most prominent sex symbol of the last century, but her image cannot be used to promote a highbrow West Palm Beach strip club, her estate argued in a federal lawsuit filed last week.

Monroe’s of Palm Beach is infringing on the late actress’ trademark by using her name and image in its signs, its Twitter account and its very name, according to the lawsuit filed by the estate of Marilyn Monroe, which is based in New York.

Until recently, some of its fliers featured a silhouette reminiscent of the iconic scene from The Seven Year Itch in which Monroe’s skirt is blown from a blast of air coming from a subway vent.

A manager at the West Palm Beach club, who identified himself only as John, said the business has stopped using the skirt silhouette, but denied the club is trying to profit from the memory of Marilyn Monroe. The club uses images of numerous 1950s stars, including Lana Turner, Bettie Page and the Rat Pack, he said.

‘Monroe,’ he said, was the name of the club owner’s cat, and the name was chosen in jest as a challenge to Rachel’s, a rival strip club believed to be named after its owner’s cat.”

’50 Years Later’ at Miami Beach

 

A selection of Marilyn’s best films are due to be screened at the Miami Beach Cinematheque, including Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (August 30), How to Marry a Millionaire (September 6), The Seven Year Itch (September 13), and Some Like it Hot (September 20), reports Florida IUSM.

This retrospective, entitled ‘Marilyn: 50 Years Later,’ is accompanied by an exhibition of vintage memorabilia from the MBC archive, including posters, programs and other promotional items; a complete portfolio of ten European portraits by Andy Warhol; and various items on loan from the World Erotic Art Museum.

Marilyn Art Exhibit in Miami

‘Marilyn Monroe: Tribute to an Icon’ is a new exhibition, featuring 21 artists, opening on August 22 and running through to October 10 at Miami’s Galleria Ca’d’Oro, reports Art Daily.

“The exhibition showcases a life-size sculpture of Marilyn wearing the iconic white dress immortalized by Seward Johnson in her most famous pose; an unusually lanky rendition by Valentina De Martini, a naked Marilyn immersed in color by Pablo Echaurren, a pop interpretation by Ludmilla Radchenko alongside the Marilyn series produced by Andy Warhol, a decollage by Mimmo Rotella, a witty composition by Leonardo Hidalgo, a painting with a real black diamond on the famous Marilyn beauty mark by Enrico di Nicolantonio and a live performance by Erika Calesini. The tribute to the American starlet comes to life in a 28-work exhibition that includes paintings, photographs, video, installations, and sculptures.

Pepsi Italy has created a Pepsi Light limited edition can to commemorate the myth and the 50th anniversary of the death of the timeless star. Among all the artists that made Marilyn immortal, Pepsi chose Sid Maurer; who’s many talents range from painting to music- to create an art can which captures the charisma, femininity, and sex appeal of the world famous style icon. The collectable Marilyn can will make it’s first U.S. appearance at the opening reception at Galleria Ca’ d’Oro.”

‘Bus Stop’ at Palm Coast

William Inge’s Bus Stop gets another revival in Florida, at the Palm Coast City Repertory Theatre (inside Hollingsworth Gallery), with Annie Gaybis as Cherie, through to Sunday, February 26:

‘City Repertory Theatre in Palm Coast is presenting this Inge classic as a full-bodied simulated radio broadcast, enhanced with costumes, theatrical lighting, limited action and a full range of sound effects.
Show times are 7:30 p.m. Feb. 24-25, and 2 p.m. Feb. 26 in the theatre inside Hollingsworth Gallery, 160 Cypress Point Parkway, Palm Coast, at City Market Place behind Walmart.

Directors John Sbordone and Bobbi Fouts have assembled a terrific cast of veteran actors: Annie Gaybis stars as Cherie. Ancient City theatergoers were recently treated to her stage craftsmanship as Maggie in last years’s “Cat On a Hat Tin Roof.” Here, (no surprise) she blows the roof off the place with a dynamite performance that culminates in her all-stops-out rendition of “That Old Black Magic.”’

Full review at Compass