David Bromley: Painting Marilyn

Marilyn by David Bromley, after Kashio Aoki's 1952 photo
Marilyn by David Bromley, after Kashio Aoki’s 1954 photo

‘Marilyn at 90: A Tribute to David Bromley’ features a number of paintings by the Australian artist, and is currently running at the Andrew Weiss Gallery in Los Angeles alongside another Bromley exhibition, ‘L.A. Women’, until September 1.

Mixed media print, based on another Aoki photo
Mixed media print of Marilyn and Joe DiMaggio, based on another Aoki photo
This David Bromley painting is inspired by a Milton Greene portrait of Marilyn
This David Bromley painting is inspired by a Milton Greene portrait of Marilyn
Another Greene-inspired painting
Another Greene-inspired painting

 

Marilyn Exhibit in Sydney

William Carroll, 1946

Something for Australian fans to get excited about: throughout June, the Trevor Victor Harvey Gallery in Sydney is holding an exhibition of rare Marilyn photographs by Bert Stern, George Barris, William Carroll, Laszlo Willinger, Kashio Aoki, and others – and they’re for sale, too.

Carroll, Aoki at LA Gallery

Among the more rare items on display at the ‘Becoming Marilyn’ exhibition, at the Andrew Weiss Gallery in Los Angeles, are these photographs of Marilyn Monroe and Joe DiMaggio arriving at Tokyo Airport in March 1954 for their honeymoon, taken by Kashio Aoki.

Allie Is Wired reports that Bill Carroll, one of the first professional photographers to work with then-model Norma Jeane Dougherty in 1946 made a special guest appearance at the gallery last week, and shared his memories of the young MM. (The article dates Carroll’s photographs to 1945, but from her hair colour I would say it was taken a year later.)

In 1945, Carroll was in need of “cover cards” for his film business and decided to schedule a Santa Monica photo shoot with his friend’s recent catch, Norma Jeane. Carroll wanted a “good-looking Plain Jane, the kind of kid you’d like to live next to” and thought Norma Jeane fit the bill. It wasn’t until 40 years later when “leafing through Time Magazine” that Carroll recognized a picture of Norma Jean by David Conover that he processed oh so many years ago. Carroll spent the next few months going through old photographs until he found all of the 1945 photos of a young Marilyn Monroe posing in Santa Monica.

Rare outtake by Bill Carroll