Warhol’s Marilyn in Rochester

On Friday, May 31, Rochester Museum of Fine Art in New Hampshire will present a one-day exhibition of their latest acquisitions – four Warhol screenprints of Marilyn – as Seacoast Online reports.

“After Warhol published his famous Factory Additions of Marilyn artwork, he began collaborating with two anonymous friends from Belgium on a second series of prints. The original idea behind this partnership, for Warhol, was to play on the concept of mass production. He was essentially mocking the idea that Factory Addition prints were somehow more important than the second series. Warhol provided the photo negatives and colour codes needed to create silkscreens exactly like the ones he had used for the Factory Additions. In 1970, Warhol’s original silkscreens were reproduced to create the second series of screenprints. These were named Sunday B. Morning prints.”

Marilyn’s Chocolate Box Mystery

Although she isn’t named, the lovely lady shown on this box of Belgian chocolate, illustrated by Jaak De Koninck of the Leuven-based interior design company, Starbrook Airlines (and spotted at Brussels Airport), looks very Marilyn-inspired – don’t you agree?

More info here.

Thanks to Liesl at Marilyn Remembered

UPDATE: These Belgian chocolate selections are also available at TK Maxx (spotted by Fraser)

Marilyn, Mickey and ‘Innocence Lost’

This unsettling painting – in which Marilyn’s image is merged with Mickey Mouse – is part of  ‘A Loss of Innocence’, the new exhibition from Costa Rican artist John Paul Fauves, at the Meir Art Gallery in Antwerp, Belgium, Forbes reports. You can view more of Fauves’ work here.

“For me, inspiration comes in a few different forms – but I am constantly perplexed and intrigued with the human population that surrounds me on a daily basis. The inception of this theme ‘A Loss Of Innocence’ stems from watching my son grow up and discover the physical and social aspects of the world. As he ages from a toddler to a young boy, I’ve held onto the idea of his naivete and his inevitable introduction to the dangers of the world. This is why the iconic ‘Mickey Mouse’ is used so heavily throughout the series. Viewing this symbol outside the realm of Disney makes the viewer engage with the familiar image in an unsettling and heavily abstracted background, forcing them to re-think their relationship with the beloved character.”