Andy Warhol’s Marilyn in Michigan

This 1967 screenprint is featured in Andy Warhol: A Day in the Life, now on display at the Eli and Edythe Broad Museum (or MSU Broad) at Michigan State University, East Lansing, until May 6.

Andy Warhol: A Day in the Life​ ​pulls​ ​back​ ​the​ ​veil​ ​on​ ​one​ ​of​ ​the​ ​twentieth​ ​century’s​ ​most important​ ​and​ ​iconographic​ ​artists.​ ​As​ ​with​ ​many​ ​artists​ ​and​ popular​ ​figures,​ ​Warhol’s​ ​public persona​ ​and​ ​identity​ ​were​ ​tightly​ ​controlled—a​ ​brand​ ​in​ ​and​ ​of​ ​itself.​ ​Warhol​ ​once​ ​said:​ ​’If​ ​you want​ ​to​ ​know​ ​Andy​ ​Warhol,​ ​just​ ​look​ ​at​ ​the​ ​surface​ ​of​ ​my​ ​paintings​ ​and​ ​films​ ​and​ ​me,​ ​and​ ​there I​ ​am.​ ​There’s​ ​nothing​ ​behind​ ​it.’​But​ ​the​ ​passage​ ​of​ ​time​ ​and​ ​accounts​ ​from​ ​those​ ​close​ ​to​ ​him reveal​ ​a​ ​different​ ​story.​ ​In​ ​particular,​ ​through​ ​his​ ​daily​ ​photographic​ ​habits,​ ​obsessive​ ​film​ ​and audio​ ​recording,​ ​and his interest in a wide range of subject matters,​ ​we​ ​are​ ​able​ ​to glimpse​ ​aspects​ ​of​ ​his​ ​more​ ​intimate​ ​world,​ ​offering​ ​a​ ​unique​ ​perspective​ ​on​ ​one​ ​of​ ​America’s most​ ​famous​ ​artists.”

Marilyn Movie Mania in Michigan

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Hope College in Holland, Michigan will pay tribute to Marilyn with a season of four films at the Knickerbocker Theatre on Monday nights this August, including Monkey Business (August 1); There’s No Business Like Show Business (August 8); The Seven Year Itch (August 15) and Some Like it Hot (August 22.)

‘Some Like it Hot’ in Michigan

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The Franke Center for the Arts in Marshall, Michigan is offering ‘a hot date with Marilyn’ at 7pm on April 9, when a fundraising screening of Some Like it Hot will be accompanied by costume contests, raffles and some intriguing prizes – including a luxury weekend break in Chicago, where the movie is partly set. Tickets cost $15, with more details available from the Daily Reporter.

The movie will be shown in two parts, with a 25-minute intermission, during which food and concessions will be available. Raffles, prizes, intermission treats and other entertainment will fill out the evening.

‘During one of the raffles, we’re going to give away a two-night stay at the Intercontinental – one of Chicago’s best hotels,’ [Patty] Williams said. ‘Because the movie begins in Chicago, we thought it would be a nice touch to offer a Chicago vacation – even though Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon decide that the town is too hot for them.'”