Marilyn: The Hit Collection

Marilyn Monroe: The Hit Collection is the latest in a growing number of new vinyl compilations. Released by Zyx Music and available from various outlets (including Amazon), the album features a reworked ‘Happy Birthday/I Wanna Be Loved By You’ (Mr President Mix) alongside 15 original recordings.

The cover photo, taken by Richard Avedon in 1957, also appeared on Marilyn Monroe: Never Before and Never Again (1988), but the content is different.

Collecting Marilyn On Vinyl

A new vinyl album of Marilyn’s selected recordings has been released in France, with a beautiful Ben Ross photo on the cover. It’s available now from Amazon stores worldwide.

1. Diamonds are a girl’s best friend
2. My heart belongs to daddy
3. One silver dollar
4. I’m through with love
5. Let’s make love
6. Bye bye baby
7. Heatwave
8. You’d be surprised
9. River  of no return
10. Incurably romantic
11. Running wild
12. I’m gonna file my claim

Thanks to Fraser Penney

Marilyn: ‘Loved By You’ On Vinyl

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I Wanna Be Loved By You is a new vinyl compilation from the French label, Wagram (perhaps inspired by this year’s exhibition of the same name in Provence.) Among the twelve tracks are lesser-known gems like ‘Incurably Romantic’, Marilyn’s duet with Yves Montand. Now on sale at Amazon stores worldwide, the album is also available as an MP3 download.

Thanks to Fraser Penney

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Marilyn at Julien’s: Let’s Make Music

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Marilyn’s RCA Victor award for ‘I’m Gonna File My Claim‘ after it was released as a single to promote River of No Return and sold 50,000 copies in 1954, as well as promotional materials, are among the items in the upcoming Julien’s sale.

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An unedited, 30-minute audio recording of Marilyn performing multiple takes of ‘Runnin’ Wild’ and ‘I Wanna Be Loved By You’ (from Some Like It Hot) on a reel of acetate tape, from the estate of Studio 7612 owner Myron Blackler, is also on offer.

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Marilyn’s personal songbook – containing more than 369 indexed pages of song standards, such as Cole Porter’s ‘You Do Something To Me’ – is up for bids. Receipts show that in February 1960, Marilyn purchased three albums by Frank Sinatra; and in April 1962, she bought a live double-album by Judy Garland.

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Finally, a set of vinyl compilations featuring Marilyn herself are on sale, as collected by Monroe Sixer Frieda Hull.

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‘I Wanna Be Loved’ On CD + Vinyl

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I Wanna Be Loved,  a 12-track vinyl selection of Marilyn’s finest recordings, is now available from French label Le Chant Du Monde via Amazon and other music stores. And for bargain hunters, a 55-track CD boxset has also been released, with a 30-page, fully illustrated booklet (the text is in French, of course.)

Thanks to Fraser Penney

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‘Marilyn’ Soundtrack Reissued on Vinyl

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The soundtrack to Twentieth Century-Fox’s 1963 documentary, Marilyn, has been reissued on vinyl by Rumble Records. As with the original release, it includes a print of the cover photo. You can watch the documentary on Youtube; it was also reissued digitally last year, as part of the Fox100 celebrations.

“Released in the same year that America’s obsession died of an overdose of barbiturates in her Brentwood home, this Marilyn Monroe release compiles her tunes from the classic musicals There’s No Business Like Show Business(1954), River of No Return (1954), and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953). Here performing songs from such legendary American songwriters as Hoagy Carmichael and Irving Berlin, Marilyn may not have been the most classically trained vocalist in history but the voice is undeniably recognizable; she performed here as an American icon, and looked good doing it.”

You may recall that Marilyn was also recently included as a bonus CD on Soundtrack Factory’s Some Like it Hot reissue. Unfortunately, the audio commentary from the original Marilyn – and the introductory Fox fanfare – was omitted from the CD, and it doesn’t appear on the vinyl reissue either.

A1KSlPdET+L._SL1500_I think they haven’t had access to the original source tapes,’ says Immortal Marilyn staffer Fraser Penney. ‘In the commentary you hear ‘The Girl’ theme used in The Seven Year Itch and none of that is noted on the original sleeve or tracklist, so I think they’ve basically just gathered together the songs and compiled it from whatever has been available to them without actually knowing the commentary was there on the original album. The original LP was re-issued many times, most widely known as Remember Marilyn, up to the 1980s and always had that. ‘ However, Fraser also tells me that the versions of the songs on this LP are better quality than those versions included on the CD.

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When Marilyn Sings

MM fan Tiina Lindholm found an older vinyl compilation in a Finnish thrift store. Remember Marilyn includes a 12pp photo book with a lovely tribute from Lionel Newman, Marilyn’s musical arranger on all her major films for Twentieth Century-Fox, including Gentlemen Prefer Blondes, River of No ReturnThere’s No Business Like Show Business, and Let’s Make Love.

‘Marilyn Monroe was my friend – a very dear and special friend. She was an exceptionally warm, compassionate, surprisingly self-conscious girl. I found her to be fiercely loyal – sometimes to a fault.

An example of her self-consciousness happened while we were making the picture “River Of No Return”. In it Marilyn was to sing a very simple lullaby to a little boy with just a guitar accompaniment. Somehow or other she couldn’t believe she would be accepted doing something as gentle as this, due to her so-called “sexy” image. It took many hours of reassurance to finally get her to believe in herself with regard to this sequence in the picture. The final result was most rewarding, especially to her.

Contrary to her glamorous “sexy image”, Marilyn would come to the recording stage wearing a plain pair of old slacks and a sweater, no makeup, and her hair looking like a tossed salad. But even in such casual dress she retrained that very warm, unaffected, detached appearance, yet still exuded sex.

Very often after a full and tiring day of recording, Marilyn, my wife Beverly, and I would take a long drive, grab a hamburger, eat in the car, and then just talk about anything except the motion picture business. She loved to laugh, and I had the fortunate ability to make her laugh.

The rumors about Marilyn being late for work never applied to her recording dates. She was always punctual if not ahead of time, and worked just as conscientiously and diligently as anyone else. A very odd thing happened when Marilyn would record her playbacks for whatever picture we were doing. I was happy to have the musicians show up – but with Marilyn the recording stage was always loaded with outside people. It literally appeared as though the studio had shut down. Secretaries, Sound Department employees, kids from the mail room, the Publicity Department, Construction, Art Department – you name it, they’d all be there. She was electrifying in that excitement always followed her. The men in the orchestra adored her. She was always congenial, courteous, not temperamental, and never forgot to thank everyone who worked with her on the stage. This included the orchestra, sound recording crew, etc. I must say, however, that she was damned sure of what she wanted without the sometimes big scene that other “super stars” made. She would be up-tight at times when visitors got out of hand and made it necessary to have them clear the stage. Ten minutes later she would feel awful for having had to do such thing.

Many people didn’t believe – and still don’t believe she did her own singing. Well, that’s all a lot of nonsense. Marilyn did all her own singing – every single word. There was never any question about “dubbing” her voice. She wouldn’t have allowed it since it was unnecessary, and to her, it would have been a cop out.

Another example of how hard she worked was when we were making “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes”. One of the big numbers was “Diamond’s Are A Girl’s Best Friend”. We made eleven takes on a very long and difficult number. (We recorded voice and orchestra simultaneously – Marilyn wouldn’t have it any other way. She felt that the performance would suffer if we recorded orchestra and voice separately on different days – “over dubbing”). I okayed the first take, but Marilyn felt she wanted to go on. In the end she went back to the first take, but she jumped up on the podium, apologized to the orchestra for having worked them so hard, and said “Lionel was right”. My association with her was just that straight and direct.

Marilyn used to call me her “personal music director” and consequently I was assigned to do all her pictures at 20th Century-Fox. She was everything to all men, but to me she was really something very special. I miss her – I shall always miss her. She was literally one of a kind. I was fortunate to know her, to love her, let alone have the privilege of working with her.’

October 26, 1972

Lionel Newman