Pamela Keogh Clarke Interviewed

“I am also amazed at how much ‘junk’ is written about MM. The only reason I can think of that people get away with it, is because there is no one to ‘protect’ her – she really doesn’t have any family, or anyone to stand up for her interests, so people just make up junk about her (or did, right after she died), and then some people today print it as fact without doing any original research. I think there is less of this today (perhaps because of the internet? Not sure.). But right after she died – wow, there was a lot of junk written with no factual validation. Just crazy stuff.”

The author of Are You a Jackie or a Marilyn? is interviewed by Scott Fortner over at the Marilyn Monroe Collection Blog, where you can also enter a competition to win a copy of Pamela’s book – but hurry, the deadline is tomorrow!

More on ‘MM: Personal’

Photo by Mark Anderson

“Marilyn Monroe is the most famous, ubiquitous, and idolized woman of our modern age. An icon of physical beauty, sexuality, and the quintessentially American dream, Marilyn’s legend continues to grow four decades after her death. MM:Personal is a new and illuminating look behind the veil of that legend, reproducing artifacts and documents – thought to have been lost since 1962 and never before revealed to the public – to clarify, qualify, or reverse many common conceptions about the blond bombshell. Selected from more than 10,000 largely unseen and heretofore unpublished items that were stored in Marilyn’s two personal file cabinets – the ‘Rosetta Stones of Marilyn Monroe scholarship’ – the collection also draws from the important collections of Greg Schreiner and Scott Fortner. These documents, snapshots, letters, memorabilia, and ephemera are joined by the first account of Monroe’s life since Gloria Steinem’s Marilyn to be written by a feminist historian, Dr Lois W. Banner, bringing a depth of understanding previously unavailable to her life. New answers come to light, such as what the dimensions were of Marilyn’s personal management of her public persona, Marilyn’s relationship to the photographers with whom she worked, how sensitive she was to her fans, and the tenor of her marriages to Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller. MM:Personal promises to completely refocus how we view Marilyn’s private life, personal relationships, and legacy.”

Synopsis from Amazon

Marilyn in Korea: ‘This One Is My Favourite’

Spotted by MM fan Colby George at a US branch of Target, this wall print features a lovely, candid shot from Marilyn’s 1954 visit to Korea, where she entertained American troops – later describing her trip as ‘the happiest time of my life’.

Information from Scott Fortner:

“Would you like to know something amazing? On two occasions, I was lucky enough to go through the two ‘missing file cabinets’ full of Marilyn Monroe documents and property. These were the cabinets from the Vanity Fair article. I saw an original of this shot in one of the cabinets. Marilyn Monroe herself owned this actual photo of her. It was likely given to her when she was there in Korea and she saved it, or perhaps it was sent to her by the GI that took the picture. On the back in Marilyn’s own handwriting a passage written, ‘This one is my favorite.'”

‘Diamonds’ Dress Sells for $310,000 at Profiles in History

But is it the same dress that Marilyn wore, asks collector Scott Fortner today…

“The dress Marilyn actually wore in the film (below) is a vibrant and shiny fabric, quite unlike the material of the dress sold at auction (above). In many other examples of proven authentic costumes, they look very much today the same way they did when worn by Marilyn in her films. Most often the colors match, as do the materials and fabrics … The dress that sold at auction is likely a copy of the dress that Marilyn actually wore. We’ll never know for sure if this was in fact the dress Marilyn wore in the number, though personally I don’t believe that to be the case. What is undeniable is the fact that there is more than one pink dress as there are actually two known to exist today.”

UPDATE: A last word from Andrew Hansford, author of Dressing Marilyn, a book about Travilla’s costumes…

 “I was asked by the press if this was the original dress. I did a lot of research and found the following: it had all the right tags and studio numbers so I have to assume it was a Travilla, however and how many time I have said this is amazing, he always made a few of the dresses to check shape and wearability especially in this gown as it was so complicated to create. The dress she wore did have felt lining, this one has not – so no it was not worn in the film. I may have been tried on by her. But it stops there. The dress in the Travilla collection is a prototype and has so many corrections and alterations on it, including at least three cut out linings, which I can only assume did not work. Hense the felt. From his notes he stated she wore two identical copies in that scene as it took so long to shoot and of course no retouching then, any dirt on it and on with the next one.”

‘Marilyn Remembered’ at the Hollywood Museum

A new exhibition devoted entirely to Marilyn Monroe opened at the Hollywood Museum on June 1st, which also marked the 84th anniversary of Marilyn’s birth in Los Angeles. The exhibit combines the collections of Scott Fortner, and Greg Schreiner (president of the L.A.-based Marilyn Remembered fanclub.)

Some of the highlights are listed here

Scott Fortner talks about his collection here

Exhibition catalogues can be previewed and ordered here

‘Marilyn Remembered: An Intimate Look at the Legend’ continues until August 31st.

WHERE: The Hollywood Museum, 1660 N. Highland Avenue, Hollywood
WHEN: 10 am to 5 pm Thursday through Sunday
PRICE: $15 for adults; $12 for seniors and children under 12.
Public Info: (323) 464-7776