Hollywood vs. Marilyn Monroe


“Monroe was no meek studio star.  She tested the weakened boundaries that governed star contracts in the early ‘50s, and fled Hollywood, formed her own production company, and chose her own projects.  Monroe also ‘acted out what mattered’ to people in the 1950s — which is to say, she acted out sex — and did so in a manner that seemed to heighten and soothe anxieties about sexuality during the era.  As a result, she also proved a singular challenge to the gossip industry, which had little experience in processing an image of which sexuality was so forthrightly a part.”

A fascinating look at Marilyn and the gossip rags, part of a thesis on ‘Problem Stars’ by Anne Helen Petersen

‘Some Like it Hot’ in Toronto


Some Like it Hot seems to be very popular this month – maybe it’s an end-of-summer thing…

“Riverdale Park is getting hot on Sunday.

Movies in the Park present a free screening of ‘Some Like It Hot’ starring Marilyn Monroe on Sunday, Aug. 22.

The movie screens in Riverdale Park East at 8:45 p.m.

People are encouraged to come out with a picnic, blankets, and lawn chairs to enjoy the event with their friends, families and neighbours.

Each movie night supports a local charity; Sunday’s movie supports the Toronto Kiwanis Boys and Girls Clubs in Regent Park.

Riverdale Park East is located at 550 Broadview Ave., south of Danforth Avenue.”

Inside Toronto

Marilyn on the Tokyo Subway

Umbrellas left behind in the subway (June 1976)

‘This Marilyn Monroe poster aims to remind passengers to take their umbrellas with them when they leave the train. The text in the top right corner — ‘Kaerazaru kasa’ (umbrella of no return) — is a play on ‘Kaerazaru Kawa,’ the Japanese title for River of No Return, the 1954 movie starring Monroe.’

Pink Tentacle

When Marilyn Met Joan Rivers

“‘It was a 1951 dinner party. I was a first-year English student at Barnard. My father was a doctor and so was the guy who hosted the party. Marilyn was very shy, so they sat her next to the least threatening person in the room – me.’

Growing bold as the night progressed, Joan Molinski (Rivers’s given name) found the courage to advise Monroe that she, too, hoped for a career in show business.

‘Honey, let me tell you a secret, Marilyn told me,’ Rivers continues, adopting Monroe’s feathery voice. ‘Men are stupid and they like big tits.'”

Canada Globe & Mail

Get the Marilyn Treatment at Lush

“Named after the most famous blonde in the world.

Softness, brightness and shine for blonde hair. Marilyn is for blondes who would like to stay blonde and become even more so, in a gentle, shiny and natural way. Use The Blonde shampoo, then use this pre-wash conditioner as a regular top-up.

Enhances golden tones.

We make it with softening linseed gel, chamomile for lightness and to calm your scalp, saffron for golden colour, lemon for shine and olive oil to moisturise your hair. It also lightens gradually.”

Available at Lush Cosmetics

Reviewed at Ciao

Thanks to Anna-Clare

Marilyn’s 2010 Memorial at Westwood

Photo by Scott Fortner

Speakers at this year’s service, organised by Marilyn Remembered Fan Club:

  • John Gilmore, author of Inside Marilyn Monroe
  • Noreen Siegel, wife of Dr Lee Siegel, Marilyn’s longtime physician at Twentieth Century Fox
  • Marion Collier, ‘Olga’ from Sweet Sue’s Band in Some Like It Hot
  • Audrey Franklin, Ella Fitzgerald’s promoter (Marilyn arranged for Ella to perform at LA’s Mocambo Club in 1954)
  • Stanley Rubin, producer of River of No Return
  • Lois Banner, Professor of History and Gender Studies at USC, currently working on two books about Marilyn
  • Diana Levitt, whose father, F. Hugh Herbert, directed Marilyn’s first movie, Scudda Hoo! Scudda Hay! in 1947. Diana also took acting classes with Marilyn

For a personal account of the service by ‘misskelleen’, join the 1962 community at LiveJournal