Advertisers Take Marilyn to the Superbowl

Marilyn by Alfred Eisenstadt, 1953

Following the Snickers ad featuring Marilyn and Willem Dafoe, last night’s Superbowl included two further references to MM. The first was a coda to the Snickers ad, with Eugene Levy playing the ‘fan guy’, reports Adweek. (And if you’re wondering how Marilyn made it into the original clip, Bustle has some suggestions.)

“‘You wouldn’t have Hollywood history without the fan guy,’ Levy said in a statement. ‘It was an honor to portray one of Tinsel Town’s forgotten heroes. Marilyn Monroe might’ve been looking down at him, but every guy in America was looking up to that stage hand.'”

Meanwhile, Alfred Eisenstadt’s 1953 portrait of Marilyn – representing beauty – appeared in another Superbowl commercial for Fiat Chrysler’s Jeep brand, AdAge reports. This is not a first – footage of Marilyn was used in Bob Dylan’s Chrysler ad for the Superbowl back in 2014.

“‘Portraits,” which aired during the halftime show, looks backwards, weaving in references to Jeep’s 1941 roots as a military vehicle created for Allied soldiers in World War II. The spot uses 60 images from around the world, including photos of famous people who have links to Jeep … Ms. Monroe — who also starred posthumously in a Snickers Super Bowl ad this year — is connected to Jeep via a honeymoon trip she took to Korea with Joe DiMaggio in the wake of the Korean War.”

The Secret Life of ‘LIFE’

Marilyn, as photographed by Alfred Eisenstadt (1953)

If you’re wondering why you’ve never seen this magazine cover before, that’s because it was never published. In fact, it’s one of several mock-ups featured in The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, the latest big-screen adaptation of James Thurber’s classic short story, starring Ben Stiller as the hapless daydreamer. You can view a selection of fantasy Life covers here.

Pictured below: Marilyn with Danny Kaye, who first played Mitty in 1947; and a selection of actual Life covers (the one in the middle is a special tribute issue from 2009, reviewed here.)

Richard Kirby: ‘The Birthday Girl’

Some of you may know Richard Kirby as author of the 2010 biography, Something Had to Give. On Marilyn’s birthday, he shared his thoughts on his personal blog:

“I’m sure most of you will have a favourite Marilyn film – mine is Don’t Bother to Knock – and some will have a favourite photograph (although there are quite a few to choose from!).  Mine is this 1953 shot taken by Alfred Eisenstaedt – for me it just encapsulates everything about this remarkable young woman.

Her expression seems to convey Marilyn alone with her thoughts… her dreams maybe, but there is the tiniest hint of fear in her eyes and for me, the photo perfectly displays the stark contrast between Marilyn’s beauty and vulnerability.

The picture will have probably been posed, yet looks effortlessly natural, and captivating as a result.”