Marilyn at the Hollywood Studio Club

Photo by Laszlo Willinger

Marilyn Monroe, as a virtually unknown 22 year-old, lived at the Hollywood Studio Club, 1215 North Lodi Place, a hostel for young actresses, between 1946-47, sharing room 307 with Clarice Evans. She returned for a second stay in 1948.

The Studio Club closed in 1975, and the building is now owned by the YMCA. Other famous alumni include Kim Novak, Ayn Rand, Peg Entwhistle and Sharon Tate.

Vintage interview with roommate Clarice Evans at The Pittsburgh Press

Mini-documentary on the Studio Club, posted by The Actors’ Workshop on Youtube

Thanks to Megan at Everlasting Star – more information here

Marilyn’s Last Home On Offer

“Sprawling & very special authentic 1929 Hacienda situated behind tall gates at the end of a quiet cul de sac on over 23K sq ft (per assessor) of tree-filled grounds. The crown jewel & largest property of all the Helenas (one of Brentwood’s most romantic & coveted locations) affording lovely vistas & grt privacy & seclusion yet in close proximity to San Vicente shops & restaurants & the Sunday Farmers’ Market. Thick walls, traditional casement windows, polished concrete & terra cotta tile floors, original wood beamed ceilings & period hardware & tiles create a warm, inviting & unique environment. French doors open to private courtyard, expansive grassy yard, pool, citrus grove & beautiful setting. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths + formal living room, family room, office, pool-side game room & separate children’s play house. Sun-filled cook’s kitchen opens to spacious courtyard garden. Wonderful charm & great architecture inside & out. Magical property in the finest Brentwood neighborhood.” – Sawbuck.com

More photos at David Offer Homes

When Marilyn Danced with Harold Arlen

Marilyn with Harold Arlen at the El Morocco, NYC, 1955

Eric Michael Gillett is staging a tribute to legendary songwriter Harold Arlen at Feinstein’s at the Regency, Park Avenue, NYC, tonight, July 10, at 8.30 pm.

“Tales about Arlen were only small peeks into the window of one of the great American Songbook masters of musical richness. Arlen was a natty dresser and at a party while dancing with Marilyn Monroe, he said ‘I think people are staring at us.’  She countered with ‘perhaps they recognize you…'”

Times Square Chronicles

One of Arlen’s most popular compositions, ‘Over the Rainbow’, as sung by Judy Garland, was played at Marilyn’s funeral in 1962.

David Marshall at Borders, San Francisco

Author David Marshall, who has written two acclaimed books about Marilyn Monroe, will be reading at Borders, Union Square in San Francisco, on August 5th – a date which also marks the 48th anniversary of Monroe’s death.

The DD Group: An Online Investigation into the Death of Marilyn Monroe is a definitive study of the mystery surrounding the star’s final days. Life Among The Cannibals: The Life and Times of Marilyn Monroe 1962-2003 is a unique work of bio-fiction, speculating on how Marilyn’s fate might have been very different had she lived to old age.

Read my Ten To One interview with David Marshall

Vanessa Paradis Steps Into Marilyn’s Shoes

A pair of Marilyn’s shoes – photo by Christie’s

In the August issue of Marie-Claire (UK edition), Vanessa Paradis speaks again of her love for Marilyn, and a very special gift from her partner, Johnny Depp:

“He actually bought me the Marilyn Monroe shoes … Monroe’s someone who touches me really deeply. I truly admire both actress and the singer that she was. I love Lazy and so many of her songs. She had a velvety voice.”

Kirkland Exhibition in Brisbane


An Australian exhibition celebrating the photography of Douglas Kirkland opens at Brisbane Gallery of Modern Art on September 11, through October 24.

Marilyn worked with Kirkland in 1961, creating some of her most provocative, sensuous images. Kirkland has also photographed Elizabeth Taylor, Audrey Hepburn, Coco Chanel and Michael Jackson.

On Sunday September 12 at 11am, Kirkland will discuss his work at the Gallery’s Cinema A.

Marilyn’s Dark Side in ‘Niagara’

Marilyn’s star turn as the murderous Rose Loomis in Niagara (1953) makes the list of 100 Essential Female Film Performances on the PopMatters website.

“I first learned about this performance from none other than musician Tori Amos. We were talking about female acting performances that inform and inspire her work during an interview and this was one that she insisted I watch, despite my not ever really warming to Monroe as an actress: ‘I just loved that. I hadn’t been into her, but one of my friends made me watch Niagara and I watched that and I just thought that there are a lot of young women that try and be dangerous Aphrodites, but she, in this role, was really dangerous. And she was seductive. To see how a woman can use her seduction and act as if she doesn’t have a brain in her head, but really is plotting the whole thing and is destroying people’s lives.’ With that recommendation, I had to go out and at least try and see the performance through a new lens, with a different eye. You know what? Tori was right. This is much more than just an icon posturing for her disciples, this was a woman who fought for dramatically substantial parts like Rose and showing people she was more than just an image. With all of the surreally bright rainbow symbolism juxtaposed with the grittiness of Monroe’s diabolical murderess, Niagara is more than just an idol earning a paycheck, and her performance is a force of nature not unlike the film’s foreboding, omnipresent falls of the title. When Tori tells you to watch something, watch it!”