Happy Thanksgiving!

“Film star Marilyn Monroe has a hug for 12-year-old Donald Thompson, a victim of Muscular Dystrophy.  Donald is holding Miss Monroe’s personal advance donation for the nation wide 1955 Thanksgiving week March of Muscular Dystrophy, sponsored by the Muscular Dystrophy Associations of America, Inc.  At the left is Jack Bostick, of Fort Worth, Texas, Vice President of the International Association of Firefighters, which is spearheading the drive beginning Monday. November 17, 1955 New York, New York, USA.”

Thanks to The Marilynette Lounge

‘Marilyn in Canada’ Exhibit

Marilyn visited Canada at least three times: as 18 year-old Norma Jeane Dougherty, in 1944; and while filming two of her movies, Niagara (1952) and River of No Return (made in 1953, released ’54.)

In February 2011, the touring Marilyn Monroe: Life as a Legend exhibit arrives in Ontario. The McMichael Canadian Art Collection are also curating ‘Marilyn in Canada’, featuring photos by John Vachon and George S. Zimbel (taken in New York City during filming of The Seven Year Itch), as well as contemporary Canadian art inspired by Marilyn.

During the long ‘Family Weekend’ of February 19-21, the exhibition opens with guided tours, films and music along with special programming every day based on these shows.

I hope that photographer Jock Carroll, whose book, Falling for Marilyn, chronicled her time in Niagara, will also be featured.

Marilyn in ‘Marie-Claire’

“In a post-war era when actresses had little power, she would fight studio heads to control her image and film roles, winning adoring fans and a legion of men along the way … She was a woman who veered between paranoia and power, innocence and bold sexuality; a woman whose life involved extraordinary triumphs and dark episodes…”

Louise Millar’s article, published in the December 2010 issue of Marie-Claire (UK edition) is based on the new Cindy De La Hoz book, Marilyn Monroe: The Personal Archives.

Thanks to ‘Not a Machine’

Marilyn in Jewellery Ad Campaign

The ‘Dreams’ collection has been launched by the Brazilian jeweller, Amsterdam Sauer, and Milton Greene’s classic photographs of Marilyn (the ballerina sessions and black sitting) are being used to promote it.

Predictably, ‘Coco’ Perez Hilton is baffled: ‘What’s weird, besides the fact that she’s dead,’ the infamous gossip blogger mused, ‘Marilyn isn’t wearing any of their jewelry in the vintage shots. It just doesn’t make sense.’

For those among us who ‘get’ Monroe’s timeless beauty, there are more details over at MM Collection Blog.

More on ‘MM: Personal’

Photo by Mark Anderson

“Marilyn Monroe is the most famous, ubiquitous, and idolized woman of our modern age. An icon of physical beauty, sexuality, and the quintessentially American dream, Marilyn’s legend continues to grow four decades after her death. MM:Personal is a new and illuminating look behind the veil of that legend, reproducing artifacts and documents – thought to have been lost since 1962 and never before revealed to the public – to clarify, qualify, or reverse many common conceptions about the blond bombshell. Selected from more than 10,000 largely unseen and heretofore unpublished items that were stored in Marilyn’s two personal file cabinets – the ‘Rosetta Stones of Marilyn Monroe scholarship’ – the collection also draws from the important collections of Greg Schreiner and Scott Fortner. These documents, snapshots, letters, memorabilia, and ephemera are joined by the first account of Monroe’s life since Gloria Steinem’s Marilyn to be written by a feminist historian, Dr Lois W. Banner, bringing a depth of understanding previously unavailable to her life. New answers come to light, such as what the dimensions were of Marilyn’s personal management of her public persona, Marilyn’s relationship to the photographers with whom she worked, how sensitive she was to her fans, and the tenor of her marriages to Joe DiMaggio and Arthur Miller. MM:Personal promises to completely refocus how we view Marilyn’s private life, personal relationships, and legacy.”

Synopsis from Amazon