Wild Strawberries: ‘Life-Sized Marilyn Monroe’

‘Life-Sized Marilyn Monroe’ was originally released in 1993 as an EP by Canadian indie band Wild Strawberries. The track can also be heard on their 1995 album, Bet You Think I’m Lonely.

Video

Booker T is playing on the radio
Jimmy Dean he plays on my mind
Someday soon I'm gonna' wipe your filthy boots
When I expose you
You Philistine, your Philistine eyes
You can take your five and dime
Shove it in your Elvis records
You can send your valentines
To your very own life sized Marilyn Monroe
You keep singing everyday's the fourth of July
I keep wondering why
I don't know how I ever met you,
Don't know why I can't forget the way you tease me
You Philistine, your Philistine eyes
You better stop calling
Kicking my love around
I don't care if you're another Rudolph Valentino
I don't care if you're the marrying kind
You better stop calling
For my love

Elle Fanning: Growing Up With Marilyn

Elle Fanning, 12 year-old sister of actress Dakota, stars with Stephen Dorff in Sofia Coppola’s Somewhere, set in one of her idol Marilyn Monroe’s favourite haunts – Hollywood’s Chateau Marmont Hotel.

I’d been there before for some interviews and photo shoots, but I hadn’t spent that much time there. Now, I feel like I know it so well. When I first got there, I was like, “Am I walking where Marilyn Monroe walked?”

This month Elle tells Interview magazine about her lifelong admiration for MM:

INTERVIEW: Is there anyone you’d really like to work with? Who was your favourite actor growing up?

ELLE: My favorite actress is Marilyn Monroe.

INTERVIEW: She’s gonna be tricky to work with.

ELLE: Yeah. [laughs]

INTERVIEW: Have you ever seen any of Marilyn Monroe’s films? Or do you just like her look?

ELLE: Yeah, I mean, of course-I love her look and everything. But I’ve seen The Seven Year Itch [1955] and I loved that. I watched that all the time when I was little. I liked the dress. I was her for Halloween when I was 7. I did the makeup and the mole and I did all the poses with blowing kisses and all that. But also, of course, I’d love to do something with my sister. I’ve never really acted with her before. I’ve played her at a younger age, but we’ve never been in the same scenes together.

Dressed as Marilyn for Halloween '05, aged 7

Elliott Murphy’s ‘Marilyn’

From the 1973 album, Aquashow, by singer-songwriter Elliott Murphy – video here

“I guess you’d say she had what it took
To make most of us take a second look
She stole our eyes but not our hearts
And all the time it tore her apart
Don’t you know she died for our sins
Marilyn Monroe died for us

What a body to make us dream
Our thoughts were dirty though she was clean
On screen we’d watch her tantalize
And with our own we would fantasize
Don’t you know she died for our sins
Marilyn Monroe died for us

Marilyn, Marilyn, I didn’t mean to do you in
Marilyn, Marilyn, now its too late to start again
Don’t you know she died for our sins
Marilyn Monroe died for us”

Amanda Lepore, ‘Marilyn’

The full-length video for ‘Marilyn’, a song by transsexual performance artist Amanda Lepore, and featuring rapper Cazwell, has just been released. Here are some of the lyrics:

Madonna, she’s too rich,
Everybody wants to be rich,
Everybody wants to be a bitch,
And Marilyn, she’s dead.

Britney, she’s too young,
Everybody wants to be young,
Everybody wants a refund,
and Marilyn, she’s in my head.

Einstein, he’s too bright,
Everybody wants to be bright,
Everybody wants to have a fight,
And Marilyn is in my head.

Elvis is a star,
Everybody wants to be a star,
Everybody wants to shoot a star,
And Marilyn, she’s dead.

A Poem for Marilyn, by Edwin Morgan

A 1968 work by the Scottish poet Edwin Morgan, who died earlier this year.

The Death of Marilyn Monroe

What innocence? Whose guilt? What eyes? Whose breast?

Crumpled orphan, nembutal bed,

white hearse, Los Angeles,

DiMaggio! Los Angeles! Miller! Los Angeles! America!

That Death should seem the only protector –

That all arms should have faded, and the great cameras and lights

become an inquisition and a torment –

That the many acquaintances, the autograph-hunters, the

inflexible directors, the drive-in admirers should become

a blur of incomprehension and pain –

That lonely Uncertainty should limp up, grinning, with

bewildering barbiturates, and watch her undress and lie

down and in her anguish

call for him! call for him to strengthen her with what could

only dissolve her! A method

of dying, we are shaken, we see it. Strasberg!

Los Angeles! Olivier! Los Angeles! Others die

and yet by this death we are a little shaken, we feel it,

America.

Let no one say communication is a cantword.

They had to lift her hand from the bedside telephone.

But what she had not been able to say

perhaps she had said. ‘All I had was my life.

I have no regrets, because if I made

any mistakes, I was responsible.

There is now – and there is the future.

What has happened is behind. So

it follows you around? So what?’ – This

to a friend, ten days before.

And so she was responsible.

And if she was not responsible, not wholly responsible, Los Angeles?

Los Angeles? Will it follow you around? Will the slow

white hearse of the child of America follow you around?

The Crooner and The Bombshell

For your weekend reading pleasure, a very special guest post from my good friend, Edgar Freire – a talented artist and poet.

“The Crooner and The Bombshell”

A Tribute to Dean Martin and Marilyn Monroe

with Andy DiMino and Susan Griffiths

at the Westchester Broadway Theatre, Elmsford, NY

Review of August 24, 2010 show by Edgar Freire

Let me begin by saying I was quite surprised when my friend Veronica invited me to see this dinner show.  I had never attended a dinner theatre production before, and I was actually surprised to know that they still existed.  I had often assumed that dinner theatre was a nostalgic activity that had its hey-day in the 50s or 60s, and was no longer around.  And when my friend and I were seated at our table directly in front of the stage, this assumption was proven partly correct as I scanned the audience and saw a lot of gray and silver-headed attendees.  That’s when Veronica and I realized we were the youngest people in the audience!

We were presented with a menu and had an hour to dine before the show began. The food was on the average side, but the wait staff was very helpful and friendly, and I was really enjoying what was a totally new (for me) form of entertainment.

The show began with Andy DiMino taking the stage as Dean Martin.  I have to admit I was not very familiar with Dean’s music before, so the material he was going to sing would be new to my ears.  But I could see (by the swaying of female heads in the audience) that his music is well loved, and certainly stirred memories of the golden days of the crooners, as well as old romances.  By the end of the evening, Andy’s performance gave me a greater appreciation for the music of Dean Martin.

After singing some more solo numbers, Andy/Dean summoned Susan Griffiths as Marilyn Monroe to the stage.  And when Susan wiggled onto the stage in a skin-tight red cocktail dress, I have to admit I could not keep my eyes off her!  Susan had Marilyn’s mannerisms and breathy voice down perfect, and there was obvious and genuine chemistry between her and Andy.

The show proceeded with the two stars singing together, then Andy left as Susan took over the spotlight, and the show continued with variations of this solo and duet arrangement.  For me particularly, it was great to hear songs from classic Monroe films in this live setting, which were re-recorded by Griffiths with just the slightest different arrangement that gave them a freshness.  I was especially pleased to hear “A Fine Romance” and “River of No Return” – two lesser-known songs from the Marilyn catalog – which were superbly rendered by Susan.

Oh, and I forgot to mention that the show contained a lot of comedy!  Andy had great comic delivery and really served the laughs, while Susan occasionally descended the stage and mingled with the audience, picking certain people in the crowd to participate in the fun.  Another highlight was the duet “Baby It’s Cold Outside”, which ended with faux snow descending onto the stage. It was a magical moment which recalled a scene from the great Hollywood musicals.

After the show, Andy and Susan were generous enough to meet in the lobby for photos and greet audience members.  I had a chance to speak briefly with Susan and ask her about the origins of the show.  Apparently, Andy had been doing Dean Martin in a solo Las Vegas show some years before, and after the two of them connected, the idea came to them to perform together as Dean and Marilyn.  I also asked Susan if there would be future shows.  According to her, they have no scheduled tour dates, but instead try to fit in shows when and where the opportunity arises.  The next day they were booked to perform the same show in Staten Island, and then she was off for an engagement in Sweden.

Susan reminded me that the show is still a work-in-progress, and that eventually they would like to integrate into the show some background history of the real-life Marilyn and Dean’s working and personal relationship.  As most Marilyn fans already know, Dean and Marilyn were close friends in real-life, and were starring together in the unfinished film “Something’s Got to Give” at the time of her death.

Double Marilyn


“I am not dead, I go only into other areas and go through your dreams.” – Michelangelo

This photo was taken on August 3, 2010 in Baden-Wurttemberg, Germany, by eagle1effi.

‘Double Marilyn’ by Claude101