Marilyn’s Letters at Bonham’s

A letter written by the young Norma Jeane Dougherty to her half-sister, Berniece Miracle, in June 1945, is among the Marilyn-related documents on auction at Bonham’s and Butterfield’s on Wednesday, April 20.

Also included are Marilyn’s first offer on her Brentwood home from 1962, and a letter from Arthur Miller to director George Cukor, thanking him for his kindness to Marilyn during filming of Let’s Make Love in 1960.

“I just wanted to thank you for the way you have behaved toward Marilyn. The picture, of course, is important to her and to you, but immeasurably more important are the precious days and weeks of her life which your patience and skill and understanding have made humanly meaningful for her. I have never known her so happy at work, so hopeful for herself, so prepared to cast away the worst of her doubts. You must know now some of the reasons why she is so precious to me and will understand the sincerity of my respect for you. / I am at work here, but I don’t know how long I’ll be able to bear this bachelorhood…”

Speaking for Bonham’s, Kathryn Williamson described Monroe as the most ‘collectable’ of stars.

Marilyn at Julien’s: Hollywood Legends 2011

Julien’s Auctions have announced a ‘Hollywood Legends’ exhibition from April 25-May 6 at their Beverly Hills office, followed by a public and online sale on May 7-8.

Items related to Marlene Dietrich, Lucille Ball and Marilyn Monroe feature in the catalogue (plus modern celebrities like Princess Diana and Angelina Jolie), which can be viewed online or ordered in print.

The black cocktail dress worn by Marilyn on the cover is among the highlights. She wore it at the press party for Some Like it Hot in 1958 (photo by Earl Leaf.)

Joseph Jasgur, 1946, signed by photographer
Richard C. Miller, 1946
Pages from Andre De Dienes’ journal
Marilyn at Harold Lloyd’s home, 1953

Barris Photos Sold at Auction

Four photographs of Marilyn, taken by George Barris, were sold at the Vision 21 auction at Bonham’s today.

“Portraits of the iconic blonde by photographer George Barris exceeded pre-auction estimates, bringing in £1,320/$2,113 (1962’s “Marilyn in the Garden” and 1954’s “Marilyn at the Window,” each), £780/$1,249 (1962’s “Marilyn on the Beach”), and £840/$1,345 (1962’s “Marilyn on the Sofa”), respectively.”

Fashion Etc

Marilyn in the Blogosphere

Andy Warhol’s Nine Multi-Colored Marilyns (Reversal Series) (1979-86) sold for £3.2 million at Sotheby’s, London, last Tuesday, after the auction was interrupted by protesters campaigning against cuts to public services, including the arts.

John Reznikoff, of University Archives, has spoken publicly for the first time about the Cusack Papers, a series forged documents relating to Marilyn and John F. Kennedy, which surfaced during the 1990s. The papers initially duped many people, including certain biographers, until they were exposed as fakes by ABC News. For more details, and to listen to the interview, visit MM Collection Blog.

Meanwhile, over at The MMM Blog, Melinda reviews the current exhibition, ‘Marilyn in Canada’, at the McMichael, Toronto.

‘There’s Something About Marilyn’

“She was a beautiful, glamourous, funny and successful woman who was also very mysterious. She didn’t have a lot of friends and didn’t hang out with Hollywood people … She was on a perpetual self-improvement quest in a way that many movie stars are not … When celebrities die before their time it is the lost potential we think about most. This happens with many famous people but Marilyn generates the greatest interest and devotion, and has therefore created the biggest market for what she left behind.”

Margaret Barrett of Bonham’s and Butterfield’s, as quoted in an article by Saul Wordsworth exploring Monroe’s enduring appeal, published in UK magazine The Market and also online.

Debbie Reynolds Confirms Auction Plans

“I am going to stop collecting and I am putting it all up for auction May 26 and 27 in Los Angeles with the auction firm Profiles in History. You sometimes have to let your dreams go. I have been trying since 1970 to share my collection with the public. I couldn’t get the backing. It’s just a shame. I am sad I couldn’t have achieved that dream come true. It was a very hard decision.”

More over at Marilyn Monroe Collection Blog