How Marilyn Captured a Critic’s Heart

In an article for Cardinal & Cream – the student magazine for Union University in Jackson, Tennessee – Randall Kendrick reveals how watching Some Like It Hot for the first time changed his opinion of Marilyn.

“Growing up, I never understood the appeal of Marilyn Monroe. Monroe just seemed like a dated icon, a symbol of Hollywood sex appeal in the much idolized decade of the ’50s. Never having any experience with any of her film roles, I figured her personality was as shallow as those of the girls in early James Bond movies (i.e. a one-dimensional accessory that’s just there to look pretty).

For a long time, I’ve had the classic 1950s comedy, Some Like It Hot, on my watch list, and for much of that time, I wasn’t even aware that Monroe was in it. Even after I learned that Monroe starred in it, her appearance had no weight on my decision to watch the movie, and frankly, I didn’t think my opinion of her would be changed afterward.

As talented as the male leads are, though, they are absolutely out-shined by Monroe. The first time Monroe’s smile filled the screen, she completely stole the movie. Her charm and magnetic personality completely sold me on her appeal. Totally unlike my original perception of her, Monroe had her own personality that shined through the screen and made her more than a pretty accessory to the plot. She was a very talented actress that created some of the funniest and most memorable moments in the film.

Monroe was so likable and had me so enraptured, that before the movie was even over, I considered going online to buy (or at least browse) Marilyn Monroe memorabilia. I didn’t end up following through with that thought, but that it even crossed my mind is a testament to why she had an incredible impact on people during the ’50s. She was the quintessential Hollywood actress with a brilliant smile, an irresistible personality and glamorous looks.

While Some Like It Hot is a good comedy on its own, it wouldn’t have achieved the status it has without the energy that Monroe brought to the table. After seeing her in action, I now honestly feel sorry I doubted the charm of Monroe and the people who propped her up as a Hollywood legend.”