Marilyn’s Pinewood, Revisited

Michelle Morgan, author of Marilyn Monroe: Private and Undisclosed, recounts her visit to Pinewood – where Marilyn filmed The Prince and the Showgirl in 1956 – for the Northamptonshire Evening Telegraph.

“Pinewood Studios is like a huge industrial estate and to say I was confused by the map would be an understatement. I wandered around; trying to follow the hand-drawn directions, but it was no use.

I eventually had to phone for help but not before I stumbled across a large castle and a medieval soldier; both of which were for the new Snow White film that is currently being shot there.”

Immortal Marilyn in December


This month’s updates at Immortal Marilyn lead us into the festive season, with a Michelle Morgan interview, a 1952 article from Marilyn herself, ‘Why I’m Not Afraid to Say Yes!’ Also, Linda Boschman has created this stunning wallpaper from the photographs of Bert Stern, whose new book for Taschen is reviewed.

A ‘Prince and the Showgirl’ Fact File


A look at the facts behind the making of The Prince and the Showgirl (as opposed to Colin Clark’s ‘fairy tale’ version), from Gary Susman at Moviefone.

“‘The Prince and the Showgirl’ was to be the first movie made by Marilyn Monroe Productions, the independent company she had formed with photographer-turned-paramour-turned-platonic-business-partner Milton Greene. The company had acquired the rights to Terence Rattigan’s London stage hit ‘The Sleeping Prince’ as a vehicle for Monroe to prove her serious thespian bona fides, although it didn’t stray too far from her roots in light romantic comedy. She’d made the deal with Rattigan herself, meeting him for drinks in a downtown New York bar before his trip to Hollywood, where he’d receive a nibble but no firm offers.”

 

‘The Misfits’ in Portland, Oregon


Marilyn’s last completed film, The Misfits, is screening at the 5th Avenue Theater, Portland, Oregon, on Saturday, December 3, at 7.00 and 9.30 pm, and on Sunday 4th at 3pm. Free admission to film students, all other tickets $3/$2, and popcorn is free.

Marilyn came to Portland in 1945 on a photo-shoot with Andre de Dienes. They also visited her mother, who was living there after leaving hospital. There was a snowstorm that night and the travellers stopped at a log cabin. And the rest, as they say, is history…

Marilyn Photos at Bonham’s December Auction

3D photos taken by Lani Carlson, of Marilyn at the party thrown in her honour to celebrate the release of ‘My Marilyn’, performed by Ray Anthony and his band in 1952, are to be sold at Bonham’s Entertainment Memorabilia auction in Los Angeles on December 14. the Daily Telegraph reports.

‘The images – which measure 1.5 inches by four inches – came to prevalence after photographer Lani Carlson decided to put them up for sale so that they could be enjoyed by Monroe fans the world over. He is also selling the copyright to them.

They were taken on a David White Stereo Realist Camera, a dual-lens point and shoot that creates a three-dimensional effect when seen through a special viewer.

Williamson added: “It wasn’t this guys profession but he was a great amateur photographer.

“He was just the sound man at this huge celeb party, but because of the great access that afforded him, he simply took advantage and went roaming with his new camera.

“He is still alive but has decided that he has had enough enjoyment from them and has decided to share them with other people.

“Understandably this is something that many film fanatics and fans of Marilyn will be interested in owning. We are estimating that it is going to sell for anything in between $70,000 and $90,000.”‘

The auction also includes candid shots of Marilyn visiting US troops in Korea, 1954, taken by Joseph Dominguez:

“It was February 1954 … and better yet, Marilyn Monroe came to Korea at this time to entertain the troops. I got to be one of her guards during her two day stay! I sneaked my cheapie camera into my field jacket and took several photos of her as I went about my guard duties … I got to exchange small talk with Marilyn and found her to be genuinely warm, tender and beautiful. I wrote some of our small talk ‘comments’ on the back of the photos … All photos are unpublished.”

Finally, some 1954-55 photos of Marilyn outside the St Regis Hotel and 21 Club in New York (possibly taken by Sam Shaw), and a contact sheet by Bob Henriques during filming of The Seven Year Itch.